Sexologist Blog

Should You Discuss Sexual Problems With Your Partner

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Television, movies, pornography, and other sensual entertainment frequently depict sex as exciting, simple, and trouble-free. Despite this, sexual issues are a prevalent condition that affects many people at some point in their lives.

According to a 2017 National Health and Social Life Survey, 75 percent of males always reach orgasm during sex, but only 29 percent of women do the same. Another study published in 2017 found that one in ten British women felt pain during sex. Moreover, according to the Merck Manual, about half of males between the ages of 40 and 70 have erectile dysfunction.

Anxiety and depression, as well as other physiological and psychological changes that occur with age or illness, can all contribute to sexual dysfunction.

Whether it's a personal problem or one involving a relationship, resolving it successfully requires cooperation and mutual understanding:

It's not a good idea to start with "your issue" or "my issue." It's a dynamic that impacts both spouses' sex lives and is created by both parties. Intimacy is not an issue for couples with a sexual difficulties as long as they know what works best for them and communicate effectively.

It's essential to get it properly at the correct time

Choose your moment wisely when discussing a sexual issue; don't bring it up when you are in a sexual situation (or about to be), and stay away from moments when you and your spouse are tired, harried, preoccupied, or moody. Avoid initiating the topic.

In particular, if the issue has been on their minds, don't just throw it at them without warning. Anger about a lack of sexual desire might manifest in sarcastic words and other unhelpful behavior. Let them know that you care about them and that this constructive chat will benefit your relationship by finding an appropriate meeting time. You can contact to a Sex health doctor for any sexual problem.

New partners

A popular query is, 'How soon should I notify a new partner that I have an issue?'

If you have a sexual issue that makes you feel vulnerable, it is understandable that you may not want to reveal it early on in the dating culture. Depending on the nature of the problem and the potential ramifications for your relationship, you should choose how and when to bring it up. The most important thing is maintaining self-confidence and self-esteem while acting honestly and honestly.

In today's society, individuals expect to have sex as soon as they start dating instead of taking the time to get to know one another. What matters most is whether or not the person you're dating is empathic; if they're not, they're not the proper person for you.

Keep your cool, calm, and collected

Remember the importance of listening to your spouse to understand their perspective and validate their feelings when dealing with a sexual issue. Keep your focus on the positive aspects of your relationship by establishing parameters for sexual activity that you both agree to. Trust and closeness will be built as a result of doing this.

There is more to sex than just penetration or orgasm or the area where the problem lies. Don't focus on the one thing you can't perform. One of the most common causes of infidelity is a partner's fear of having sex and the consequent anxiety that ensues when sexual activity is avoided. This kind of spiritual living might lead to a breakdown in a partnership if avoidance becomes persistent. Don’t hesitate to consult with a sexologist for your problem.

Do not blame or judge - offer support

Convince your spouse that you still want to be with them, despite the problem, and that you are open to expressing that desire in unique ways in addition to the traditional sexual ones. Don't get into a blaming mentality or slip into critical mode; instead, look for common ground with your partner or yourself.

While intercourse is uncomfortable or impossible for some people, most partners I've encountered would rather have sex with someone who is sexually expressive and creative than someone who is sexually unadventurous and doesn't enjoy it. When it comes to feeling secure in your skin, it's all about expressing yourself creatively.

Emphasize workable solutions

For example, erectile dysfunction, vaginal dryness, menopausal factors, vulvodynia, thrush, and sexually transmitted diseases can all be treated well in general care. The first step is to see your primary care physician or the sexual health clinic at your local hospital. Having your partner accompany you to the appointment is a practical method to strengthen your relationship.

A multidisciplinary approach and a well-managed treatment plan are often required to overcome a chronic sexual condition. Psychosexual counselling (alone or with a partner) can be essential to the journey. For a nationwide directory of licensed sexual and relationship therapists, get in touch with Gautam Clinic.